“Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virile. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched.”

Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth

(via astrolocherry)

(via tehriz)

amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty
Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.
The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.
Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.
Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.
Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.
Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.
Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.
Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.
Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.
AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.
Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.
__________________________________________________________________
Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.
amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty
Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.
The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.
Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.
Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.
Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.
Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.
Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.
Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.
Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.
AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.
Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.
__________________________________________________________________
Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.
amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty
Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.
The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.
Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.
Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.
Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.
Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.
Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.
Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.
Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.
AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.
Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.
__________________________________________________________________
Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.
amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty
Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.
The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.
Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.
Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.
Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.
Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.
Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.
Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.
Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.
AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.
Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.
__________________________________________________________________
Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.
amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty
Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.
The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.
Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.
Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.
Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.
Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.
Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.
Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.
Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.
AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.
Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.
__________________________________________________________________
Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.
amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty
Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.
The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.
Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.
Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.
Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.
Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.
Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.
Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.
Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.
AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.
Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.
__________________________________________________________________
Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.
amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty
Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.
The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.
Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.
Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.
Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.
Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.
Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.
Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.
Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.
AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.
Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.
__________________________________________________________________
Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.
amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty
Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.
The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.
Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.
Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.
Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.
Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.
Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.
Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.
Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.
AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.
Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.
__________________________________________________________________
Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.
amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty
Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.
The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.
Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.
Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.
Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.
Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.
Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.
Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.
Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.
AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.
Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.
__________________________________________________________________
Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.
amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty
Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.
The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.
Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.
Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.
Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.
Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.
Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.
Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.
Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.
AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.
Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.
__________________________________________________________________
Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.

amolecularmatter:

Deadly Beauty

Ever since our conception, humans have fallen victim to infectious disease - microscopic, airbourne pathogens and parasites that infiltrate our bodies and turn them against us. Shown above, and described below, are 10 of the deadliest pathogens humankind has encountered throughout history. Some, like poliovirus, show how far we’ve come - while others, such as HIV, remind us how far we have still to go in the  battle against nature’s smallest assassins.

The Bubonic Plague: Also called the Black Death due to the formation of necrotic tissue on living victims, the bubonic plague - most commonly caused by a small bacterium, Yersinia pestis - is estimated to have killed around 75 million people, including half the total population of Europe. Although controlled, the bubonic plague is still endemic today.

Poliomyelitis: One of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, the causitive agent of polio, poliovirus, has caused 10,000 deaths since 1916, and permanent paralysis to thousands. Its presence in the population is substantially reduced in the modern day due to an effective polio vaccine and vaccination programme.

Smallpox: Marked in history as the pathogen of choice for the first-ever documented case of biological warfare, in which smallpox-infected blankets were thrown into enemy camps, smallpox and its two viral agents - variola major (pictured above) and variola minor - decimated the Native American population in the United States from 12 million to 235,000. It is also credited with destroying the Aztec civilisation when brought to South America by the conquistadors. WHO declared the official eradication of smallpox in 1979, although samples are still stored in laboratories for research.

Cholera: Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, cholera is perhaps best known for being one of the most rapidly fatal illnesses known - a healthy person may become hypotensive within an hour of symptoms onset, and will die within 2-3 if no treatment is provided. Cholera has killed approximately 12,000 people since 1991.

Spanish Influenza: An especially virulent strain of Influenza A virus, subtype H1N1, killed 50 to 100 million people in the years 1918 and 1919 alone. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in stark contrast to the flu of today, which usually preys on the old and infirm. The extraordinary death toll is believed to have resulted from the extreme virulence of the virus and the severity of symptoms, believed to have been caused by cytokine storms.

Tuberculosis: Caused by various strains of mycobacteria, most commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis is a usually lethal and sadly common infectious disease that affects up to 80% of the population in some African and Asian countries.

Influenza: Commonly known as the flu, influenza is caused by a massive family of RNA-based viruses of the family orthomyxoviridae. It causes about 36,000 deaths per year.

Malaria: Malaria is a vector-bourne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium, typically Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. It causes approximately 2.7 million deaths per year, a large percentage of them young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine has yet been created for malaria; drugs must be taken continuously to reduce the risk of infection.

AIDS: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. Death results from specific damage to the immune system, leaving people susceptible to opportunistic infection in the late stages. Although treatments exist to decelerate the virus’ progression, there is no known cure, and 21 million have died of AIDS since 1981. HIV is usually passed by blood-to-blood transmission.

Ebola: Ebola is a potentially lethal hemorrhagic fever that has caused approximately 1,600 human deaths. It is a zoonotic disease caused by the ebola virus whose primary animal vector is thought to be the fruit bat. Mortality rates are generally very high, in the region of 80% – 90%, with the cause of death usually due to hypovolemic shock or organ failure.

__________________________________________________________________

Images: Top left: Yersinia pestis. Top right: poliovirus. Second line, left: Variola major. Second line, center: Vibrio cholerae. Second line, right: Influenza A, subtype H1N1. Third line, left: Mycobacterium tuberuclosis. Third line, right: Influeza A. Bottom left: Plasmodium falciparum in red blood cells. Bottom center: HIV. Bottom right: Ebola virus.

(via fuckyeahmedicalstuff)

neuromorphogenesis:

Neurosurgeons successfully implant 3D printed skull
A 22-year-old woman from the Netherlands who suffers from a chronic bone disorder — which has increased the thickness of her skull from 1.5cm to 5cm, causing reduced eyesight and severe headaches — has had the top section of her skull removed and replaced with a 3D printed implant.
The operation was performed by a team of neurosurgeons at the University Medical Centre Utrecht and the university claims this is this first instance of a successful 3D printed cranium that has not been rejected by the patient.
The operation, which took 23 hours, was led by Dr Bon Verweij. The patient’s skull was so thick, that had the operation not been performed, serious brain damage or death may have occurred in the near future. 
"It was only a matter of time before critical brain functions were compromised and she would die," said Dr Verweij. Major surgery was inevitable, but prior to the 3D printing technique, there was no ideal effective treatment.
The skull was made specifically for the patient using an unspecified durable plastic. Since the operation, the patient has gained her sight back entirely, is symptom-free and back to work. It is not known whether the plastic will require replacing at a later date or if it will last a lifetime. 
The lead surgeon had previous experience with 3D reconstructions of skulls, but such a large implant had never been accomplished before. “It is almost impossible to see that she’s ever had surgery,” said Dr Verweij in the university’s official statement.
It is hoped this technique can also be used for patients with other bone disorders or to repair severely damaged skulls after an accident or tumour.
neuromorphogenesis:

Neurosurgeons successfully implant 3D printed skull
A 22-year-old woman from the Netherlands who suffers from a chronic bone disorder — which has increased the thickness of her skull from 1.5cm to 5cm, causing reduced eyesight and severe headaches — has had the top section of her skull removed and replaced with a 3D printed implant.
The operation was performed by a team of neurosurgeons at the University Medical Centre Utrecht and the university claims this is this first instance of a successful 3D printed cranium that has not been rejected by the patient.
The operation, which took 23 hours, was led by Dr Bon Verweij. The patient’s skull was so thick, that had the operation not been performed, serious brain damage or death may have occurred in the near future. 
"It was only a matter of time before critical brain functions were compromised and she would die," said Dr Verweij. Major surgery was inevitable, but prior to the 3D printing technique, there was no ideal effective treatment.
The skull was made specifically for the patient using an unspecified durable plastic. Since the operation, the patient has gained her sight back entirely, is symptom-free and back to work. It is not known whether the plastic will require replacing at a later date or if it will last a lifetime. 
The lead surgeon had previous experience with 3D reconstructions of skulls, but such a large implant had never been accomplished before. “It is almost impossible to see that she’s ever had surgery,” said Dr Verweij in the university’s official statement.
It is hoped this technique can also be used for patients with other bone disorders or to repair severely damaged skulls after an accident or tumour.

neuromorphogenesis:

Neurosurgeons successfully implant 3D printed skull

A 22-year-old woman from the Netherlands who suffers from a chronic bone disorder — which has increased the thickness of her skull from 1.5cm to 5cm, causing reduced eyesight and severe headaches — has had the top section of her skull removed and replaced with a 3D printed implant.

The operation was performed by a team of neurosurgeons at the University Medical Centre Utrecht and the university claims this is this first instance of a successful 3D printed cranium that has not been rejected by the patient.

The operation, which took 23 hours, was led by Dr Bon Verweij. The patient’s skull was so thick, that had the operation not been performed, serious brain damage or death may have occurred in the near future. 

"It was only a matter of time before critical brain functions were compromised and she would die," said Dr Verweij. Major surgery was inevitable, but prior to the 3D printing technique, there was no ideal effective treatment.

The skull was made specifically for the patient using an unspecified durable plastic. Since the operation, the patient has gained her sight back entirely, is symptom-free and back to work. It is not known whether the plastic will require replacing at a later date or if it will last a lifetime. 

The lead surgeon had previous experience with 3D reconstructions of skulls, but such a large implant had never been accomplished before. “It is almost impossible to see that she’s ever had surgery,” said Dr Verweij in the university’s official statement.

It is hoped this technique can also be used for patients with other bone disorders or to repair severely damaged skulls after an accident or tumour.

instructables:

Arduino Turn Signal Biking Jacket by leahbuechley

Awesome! New project for the summer :D instructables:

Arduino Turn Signal Biking Jacket by leahbuechley

Awesome! New project for the summer :D
nevver:

Graphonaute
nevver:

Graphonaute
nevver:

Graphonaute
nevver:

Graphonaute
nevver:

Graphonaute

Instructions for a Bad Day

kayla-bird:

hall0queen:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.
A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!
Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.
All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.
Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

As someone who regularly volunteers at an animal shelter this is so so so important! 

as someone who once volunteered at an animal shelter this is so so true!
kayla-bird:

hall0queen:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.
A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!
Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.
All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.
Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

As someone who regularly volunteers at an animal shelter this is so so so important! 

as someone who once volunteered at an animal shelter this is so so true!
kayla-bird:

hall0queen:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.
A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!
Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.
All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.
Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

As someone who regularly volunteers at an animal shelter this is so so so important! 

as someone who once volunteered at an animal shelter this is so so true!
kayla-bird:

hall0queen:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.
A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!
Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.
All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.
Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

As someone who regularly volunteers at an animal shelter this is so so so important! 

as someone who once volunteered at an animal shelter this is so so true!
kayla-bird:

hall0queen:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.
A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!
Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.
All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.
Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

As someone who regularly volunteers at an animal shelter this is so so so important! 

as someone who once volunteered at an animal shelter this is so so true!
kayla-bird:

hall0queen:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.
A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!
Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.
All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.
Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

As someone who regularly volunteers at an animal shelter this is so so so important! 

as someone who once volunteered at an animal shelter this is so so true!
kayla-bird:

hall0queen:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.
A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!
Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.
All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.
Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

As someone who regularly volunteers at an animal shelter this is so so so important! 

as someone who once volunteered at an animal shelter this is so so true!

kayla-bird:

hall0queen:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.

A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!

Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.

All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.

Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

As someone who regularly volunteers at an animal shelter this is so so so important! 

as someone who once volunteered at an animal shelter this is so so true!

(via ifyoutrysometimes)